PREVENTING PEATLAND FIRES IN INDONESIA

 

ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES AND SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL FORESTS IN VIET NAM 

 

IN MONGOLIA, BETTER FORESTS

DEPEND ON BETTER LIVELIHOODS

 

A PATH TO SUSTAINABLE COCOA
AND FOREST RESTORATION IN 
Côte d’Ivoire

STORY 4

While Côte d’Ivoire has the fastest rate of deforestation in Africa, it is also one of the fastest in the world. It is vital now, more than ever, for Côte d’Ivoire to protect its remaining forests. The issue is so serious that President Alassane Ouattara signed the UN New York Declaration on Forests in 2014 and committed to restoring the national forest to 20 percent of the territory by 2030.

UGANDA: IT TAKES A VILLAGE TO MAP A FOREST

STORY 5

The Mabira is a rainforest area covering about 300 square kilometres, home to many endangered species like the primate Lophocebus ugandae, a species of Old World monkey found only in Uganda. It is one of the biggest reserves in the country. The UN-REDD Programme is supporting the Uganda National Forest Authority (NFA) in establishing an effective National Forest Monitoring System (NFMS) to track and report forest changes and to curb deforestation in the Mabira and beyond.

PANAMA'S INDIGENOUS MONITORING TECHNICIANS

 
 
 

MARKING 10 YEARS OF ACTION FOR FORESTS AND CLIMATE CHANGE

 

WHO WE ARE & OUR MISSION

Disastrous climate change cannot be averted without substantially reducing emissions from the forest and land use sector. Today tropical deforestation and forest degradation through agricultural expansion, conversion to pastureland, destructive logging, forest fires, etc. accounts for 11 percent of total global greenhouse gas emissions, larger than the entire global transportation sector. In fact, halting and reversing deforestation could deliver up to 30 percent of the climate solution, making forests one of the most cost-effective and immediate solutions to curb climate change.

 

Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) is an effort to value the carbon stored in forests as a way to create incentives for developing countries to protect their environment. Through this mechanism, which was proposed under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), developing countries that voluntarily decide to participate could qualify to receive results-based payments for their efforts.

 

Launched in 2008, the UN-REDD Programme provides countries with reliable and effective technical assistance, capacity building and policy advice to implement REDD+. It is the first global joint UN initiative on climate change and deploys the support of three agencies: the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment).

 

Over the past decade, the Programme has worked with 64 partner countries to successfully achieve substantial climate, forest and development goals. To name just a few successes: more than 30 countries have advanced their national REDD+ strategies or action plans, 40 countries were supported in developing national forest monitoring systems, and 15 countries have developed country approaches to meeting the UNFCCC social and environmental safeguards requirements.

 

To mark our anniversary, we have curated six stories showing the Programme’s impact on the ground spanning from Asia to Africa and Latin America. These testimonies demonstrate how the Programme has helped advance the protection of forests for the people and the planet.

 

This resource is made possible through the generous support of the European Commission and the governments of Norway, Denmark, Luxembourg, Japan, Spain and Switzerland.

UN-REDD Programme Secretariat 

Email: un-redd@un-redd.org

This resource is made possible through the generous support of the European Commission and the governments of Norway, Denmark, Luxembourg, Japan, Spain and Switzerland

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